Lesson Plan: Linda Ridgway, “Forever”

This lesson plan contains the Texas TEKS for Elementary, Middle, and High School art teachers. Students will learn about Linda Ridgway’s use of Tromp L’oeil and low-relief in her work Forever. Afterwards, the students will create a low-relief paper sculpture using strips of cut construction paper.


If you use or reference this lesson plan, please leave a comment with your feedback. The lesson plan can be downloaded in the link below.


Linda Ridgway, Forever, 2016, graphite on cut paper, 22.25 inches X 24 inches, Tyler Museum of Art, Tyler, Texas.

Culture: American

Subject: Fine Art, Art History

Collection: Tyler Museum of Art’s Permanent Collection

Grades: Elementary School, Middle School and High School

Topics: Artistic Practices, Art History, Critical Thinking, Low-Relief Sculpture, Paper Sculpture


Art Vocabulary

Activity Vocabulary:

Linda Ridgway:

  • Linda Ridgway was born in 1947 in the small town of Jeffersonville, Indiana.
  • She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts at the Louisville School of Art in Anchorage, Kentucky.
  • Afterwards, she gained her master’s in fine arts at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana.
  • Her fascination with art stemmed from her early childhood. When Ridgway was sick, her mother would read poems by Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson, and other poets.
  • This experience encouraged Ridgway to explore how poetry helps a composition portray complex emotions to the viewer.

Trompe L’oeil:

  • Tromp L’oeil is a style of art that presents an illusionistic image in two-dimensional and three-dimensional art. The term is from the French language and translates to ‘optical illusion’ or ‘fool the eye’.
  • In Linda Ridgway’s work, Forever, she cuts notches in a single piece of paper and pulls the still-connected flaps away from the piece. The result is a low-relief and primarily two-dimensional sculpture that looks as though it is crochet lace.

Sculpture:

  • A sculpture is a method of art that requires the artist to build a work that expands in height, width and depth. To make a sculpture, artists often use modeling, casting, carving, and construction to develop their piece.
  • Regarding paper sculptures that reference the style of Linda Ridgway’s Forever, adding paper to a single piece of paper will create a low-relief sculpture. This effect is accomplished by gluing each added piece and bending the paper from where it is glued to the paper.

Low-Relief Sculpture:

  • A low-relief is a style of relief.
    • High-Relief is when an artistically carved area on a flat surface is significantly raised. An example of high-relief would be the sculpted heads of Mount Rushmore. The mountain was carved away to create the presidential portraits. This gives the appearance of the sculptures coming out of the mountain.
    • Low-Relief is when an artistically carved area on a flat surface is slightly raised. An example of this can be found in most coins. Often, coins have a slightly raised form of a governmental official. Though it is not as prominent as the Mount Rushmore sculpture, the sculptural relief is still present in a lower manner.

Elements of Design:

  • Artists use the elements of design to create the foundation of the artwork. The elements of art include: line, shape, form, space, color, and texture.

Line:

  • An element of design; line is created on a surface with a pointed moving tool. Lines can range in size, width, texture, and presentation. Common types of line are vertical, horizontal, diagonal, zig-zag, and curved.

Shape:

  • An element of design; shape is a two-dimensional enclosed space that represents either an organic shape or a geometric shape. Geometric shapes include squares, circles, rectangles, triangles and other standard geometric shapes. Organic shapes include natural non-geometric shapes that are developed from curvilinear lines.

Form:

  • An element of design; form is a three-dimensional enclosed space that represents organic and geometric shapes in a third space. Geometric forms include cubes, spheres, triangular prisms, rectangular prisms, and cones. Organic shapes include three-dimensional forms observed in nature, such as trees, rivers, and rocks.

Space:

  • An element of design; this term defines the surface area between, before, and behind an object in a composition.

Color:

  • An element of design; this term defines the pigments used in a painting. Color can be organized into categories, such as: hues, values, complements, and intensity.

Texture:

  • An element of design; this term defines an artwork’s surface. The artist’s use of the chosen medium creates either implied or actual texture.

Principles of Design:

  • Artists used principles of design to build upon the foundational elements of design. This includes the following: rhythm, movement, balance, proportion, variety, emphasis, and unity. 

Rhythm/ Pattern:

  • A principle of design; this term defines the repetitive imagery and elements of design found in a composition.

Movement:

  • A principle of design; this term defines the visual movement observed in a painting. This can be identified as kinetic movement or implied movement. Additionally, movement can be defined as how the viewer’s eye moves throughout the composition.

Balance:

  • A principle of design; this term defines the arrangement of the presented imagery with the elements of design. It refers to either asymmetrical compositions or symmetrical compositions.

Proportion:

  • A principle of design; this term defines the comparative size between objects in the composition. It can refer to the imagery within a painting or the size between a sculpture and a real object.

Variety:

  • A principle of design; this term defines the combination of imagery, objects, and ideas in an artwork.

Emphasis:

  • A principle of design; this term defines the most prominent area in a composition. The viewer’s eye is drawn to this point because the artist used a mixture of the elements and principles of design.

Unity:

  • A principle of design; this term defines how the elements and principles of design are combined within a composition.

Bibliography: Resources for Vocabulary and Lesson Plan

“Art Term: Sculpture.” Tate Modern. Updated 2022. Accessed October 6, 2022. https://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/sculpture.

“Art Term: Trompe L’oeil.” Tate Modern. Updated 2022. Accessed October 6, 2022. https://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/t/trompe-loeil.

Ridgway, Linda. “Artist Statement.” Linda Ridgway Official Website. Updated 2020. Accessed May 24, 2021. http://www.lindaridgway.com/statement.html.

Ridgway, Linda. “Biography.” Linda Ridgway Official Website. Updated 2020. Accessed May 24, 2021. http://www.lindaridgway.com/bio.html.

Office of the Secretary of State. “§117.102: Art, Kindergarten, Adopted 2013.” Texas Education Agency: Education, updated 2013, accessed January 5, 2022, https://texreg.sos.state.tx.us/public/readtac$ext.TacPage?sl=R&app=9&p_dir=&p_rloc=&p_tloc=&p_ploc=&pg=1&p_tac=&ti=19&pt=2&ch=117&rl=102.

Office of the Secretary of State. “§117.105: Art, Grade 1, Adopted 2013.” Texas Education Agency: Education, updated 2013, accessed January 5, 2022, https://texreg.sos.state.tx.us/public/readtac$ext.TacPage?sl=R&app=9&p_dir=&p_rloc=&p_tloc=&p_ploc=&pg=1&p_tac=&ti=19&pt=2&ch=117&rl=105.

Office of the Secretary of State. “§117.108: Art, Grade 2, Adopted 2013.” Texas Education Agency: Education, updated 2013, accessed January 5, 2022, https://texreg.sos.state.tx.us/public/readtac$ext.TacPage?sl=R&app=9&p_dir=&p_rloc=&p_tloc=&p_ploc=&pg=1&p_tac=&ti=19&pt=2&ch=117&rl=108.

Office of the Secretary of State. “§117.111: Art, Grade 3, Adopted 2013.” Texas Education Agency: Education, updated 2013, accessed January 5, 2022, https://texreg.sos.state.tx.us/public/readtac$ext.TacPage?sl=R&app=9&p_dir=&p_rloc=&p_tloc=&p_ploc=&pg=1&p_tac=&ti=19&pt=2&ch=117&rl=111.

Office of the Secretary of State. “§117.114: Art, Grade 4, Adopted 2013.” Texas Education Agency: Education, updated 2013, accessed January 5, 2022, https://texreg.sos.state.tx.us/public/readtac$ext.TacPage?sl=R&app=9&p_dir=&p_rloc=&p_tloc=&p_ploc=&pg=1&p_tac=&ti=19&pt=2&ch=117&rl=114.

Office of the Secretary of State. “§117.117: Art, Grade 5, Adopted 2013.” Texas Education Agency: Education, updated 2013, accessed January 5, 2022, https://texreg.sos.state.tx.us/public/readtac$ext.TacPage?sl=R&app=9&p_dir=&p_rloc=&p_tloc=&p_ploc=&pg=1&p_tac=&ti=19&pt=2&ch=117&rl=117.

Office of the Secretary of State. “§117.202: Art, Middle School 1, Adopted 2013.” Texas Education Agency: Education, updated 2013, accessed January 5, 2022, https://texreg.sos.state.tx.us/public/readtac$ext.TacPage?sl=R&app=9&p_dir=&p_rloc=&p_tloc=&p_ploc=&pg=1&p_tac=&ti=19&pt=2&ch=117&rl=202.

Office of the Secretary of State. “§117.203: Art, Middle School 2, Adopted 2013.” Texas Education Agency: Education, updated 2013, accessed January 5, 2022, https://texreg.sos.state.tx.us/public/readtac$ext.TacPage?sl=R&app=9&p_dir=&p_rloc=&p_tloc=&p_ploc=&pg=1&p_tac=&ti=19&pt=2&ch=117&rl=203.

Office of the Secretary of State. “§117.204: Art, Middle School 3, Adopted 2013.” Texas Education Agency: Education, updated 2013, accessed January 5, 2022, https://texreg.sos.state.tx.us/public/readtac$ext.TacPage?sl=R&app=9&p_dir=&p_rloc=&p_tloc=&p_ploc=&pg=1&p_tac=&ti=19&pt=2&ch=117&rl=204.

Office of the Secretary of State. “§117.302: Art, Level I, Adopted 2013.” Texas Education Agency: Education, updated 2013, accessed January 5, 2022, https://texreg.sos.state.tx.us/public/readtac$ext.TacPage?sl=R&app=9&p_dir=&p_rloc=&p_tloc=&p_ploc=&pg=1&p_tac=&ti=19&pt=2&ch=117&rl=302.

Office of the Secretary of State. “§117.303: Art, Level II, Adopted 2013.” Texas Education Agency: Education, updated 2013, accessed January 5, 2022, https://texreg.sos.state.tx.us/public/readtac$ext.TacPage?sl=R&app=9&p_dir=&p_rloc=&p_tloc=&p_ploc=&pg=1&p_tac=&ti=19&pt=2&ch=117&rl=303.

Office of the Secretary of State. “§117.304: Art, Level III, Adopted 2013.” Texas Education Agency: Education, updated 2013, accessed January 5, 2022, https://texreg.sos.state.tx.us/public/readtac$ext.TacPage?sl=R&app=9&p_dir=&p_rloc=&p_tloc=&p_ploc=&pg=1&p_tac=&ti=19&pt=2&ch=117&rl=304.

Office of the Secretary of State. “§117.305: Art, Level IV, Adopted 2013.” Texas Education Agency: Education, updated 2013, accessed January 5, 2022, https://texreg.sos.state.tx.us/public/readtac$ext.TacPage?sl=R&app=9&p_dir=&p_rloc=&p_tloc=&p_ploc=&pg=1&p_tac=&ti=19&pt=2&ch=117&rl=305.

Ragan, Rosalins. “Elements of Art.” In Art Talk, 61 – 211. Edited by Bennett and McKnight Division. San Francisco: Glencoe Publishing Company, 1988.

Ragan, Rosalins. “The Principles of Design.” In Art Talk, 211 – 347. Edited by Bennett and McKnight Division. San Francisco: Glencoe Publishing Company, 1988.

Vanoteghem, Annie. “Low-Relief Sculpture.” Albany Museum of Art. Updated March 25, 2020. Accessed October 6, 2022. https://www.albanymuseum.com/kids-staying-inspired/low-relief-sculpture.


Elementary School Lesson Plans

Goals:

Elementary School Students of all levels will be able to do the following:

  • Identify the principles of design used in the artwork;
  • Identify the elements of design used in the artwork;
  • Recognize the difference between high-relief and low-relief sculpture;
  • Identify how to make a three-dimensional low-relief sculpture using paper;
  • Learn about Linda Ridgway and her work Forever;
  • Learn about Tromp L’oeil and how it is identified in art;
  • And, create a low-relief paper sculpture by cutting strips of construction paper and gluing one side of the cut paper to a larger sheet of white drawing paper.

Texas Elementary School TEKS:

Kindergarten, First Grade, Second Grade, Third Grade, Fourth Grade, and Fifth Grade


Kindergarten:

  • §117.102.b.1.A / B
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • gather information from subjects in the environment using the senses;
      • identify the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, and form, and the principles of design, including repetition/pattern and balance, in the environment.
  • §117.102.b.2. A / B
    • Creative Expression:
      • create artworks using a variety of lines, shapes, colors, textures, and forms;
      • arrange components intuitively to create artworks;
  • §117.102.b.4. B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • express ideas found in collections such as real or virtual art museums, galleries, portfolios, or exhibitions using original artworks created by artists or peers;

First Grade:

  • §117.105.b.1.A / B
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • identify similarities, differences, and variations among subjects in the environment using the senses;
      • identify the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, and form, and the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, and balance, in nature and human-made environments.
  • §117.105.b.2. A / B
    • Creative Expression:
      • invent images that combine a variety of lines, shapes, colors, textures, and forms;
      • place components in orderly arrangements to create designs;
  • §117.105.b.4. B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • identify ideas found in collections such as real or virtual art museums, galleries, portfolios, or exhibitions using original artworks created by artists or peers.

Second Grade:

  • §117.108.b.1.A / B
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • compare and contrast variations in objects and subjects from the environment using the senses;
      • identify the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, and space, and the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, and balance.
  • §117.108.b.2. A / B
    • Creative Expression:
      • express ideas and feelings in personal artworks using a variety of lines, shapes, colors, textures, forms, and space;
      • create compositions using the elements of art and principles of design;
  • §117.108.b.4. B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • compare and contrast ideas found in collections such as real or virtual art museums, galleries, portfolios, or exhibitions using original artworks created by artists or peers;

Third Grade:

  • §117.111.b.1.A / B / C
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • explore ideas from life experiences about self, peers, family, school, or community and from the imagination as sources for original works of art;
      • use appropriate vocabulary when discussing the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, and the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity;
      • discuss the elements of art as building blocks and the principles of design as organizers of works of art.
  • §117.111.b.2. A / B
    • Creative Expression
      • integrate ideas drawn from life experiences to create original works of art;
      • create compositions using the elements of art and principles of design;
  • §117.111.b.4. B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response
      • use methods such as oral response or artist statements to identify main ideas found in collections of artworks created by self, peers, and major historical or contemporary artists in real or virtual portfolios, galleries, or art museums;

Fourth Grade:

  • §117.114.b.1.A / B / C
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • explore and communicate ideas drawn from life experiences about self, peers, family, school, or community and from the imagination as sources for original works of art;
      • use appropriate vocabulary when discussing the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, and the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity;
      • discuss the elements of art as building blocks and the principles of design as organizers of works of art.
  • §117.114.b.2. A / B
    • Creative Expression:
      • integrate ideas drawn from life experiences to create original works of art;
      • create compositions using the elements of art and principles of design; and
  • §117.114.b.4. A / B / C
    • Critical Evaluation and Response
      • use methods such as written or oral response or artist statements to identify emotions found in collections of artworks created by self, peers, and major historical or contemporary artists in real or virtual portfolios, galleries, or art museums;

Fifth Grade:

  • §117.117.b.1.A / B / C
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • develop and communicate ideas drawn from life experiences about self, peers, family, school, or community and from the imagination as sources for original works of art;
      • use appropriate vocabulary when discussing the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, and the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity; and
      • discuss the elements of art as building blocks and the principles of design as organizers of works of art.
  • §117.117.b.2. A / B
    • Creative Expression:
      • integrate ideas drawn from life experiences to create original works of art;
      • create compositions using the elements of art and principles of design;
  • §117.117.b.4. B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response
      • use methods such as written or oral response or artist statements to identify themes found in collections of artworks created by self, peers, and major historical or contemporary artists in real or virtual portfolios, galleries, or art museums;

Elementary School Art Activities

Questions for Elementary School Students:

  1. Examine Linda Ridgway’s work Forever. Identify where each element of art is located in the art.
  2. Examine Linda Ridgway’s work Forever. Identify where each principle of art is located in the art.
  3. What is Tromp L’oeil?
  4. Is Linda Ridgway’s use of Tromp L’oeil successful? Why or why not?
  5. What is the difference between a high-relief and low-relief sculpture?

Activity: Elementary School Fine Arts

  • Activity Setting: Classroom
  • Materials: White Drawing Paper, Pencil, Coloring Pencils, Construction Paper, Scissors, and Glue Stick or Liquid Glue
  • Subject: Low-Relief Sculpture, Paper Sculpture, Color Matching
  • Texas TEKS: Kindergarten, First Grade, Second Grade, Third Grade, Fourth Grade, and Fifth Grade
  • Duration: Extended Project

The students will learn about Linda Ridgway’s use of Tromp L’oeil and low-relief sculpture in her piece Forever. Then, the students will create their own paper sculpture. This project will not require the students to employ Tromp L’oeil in the finished product. Instead, the inclusion of the subject is to help the students learn about Ridgway’s creative manipulation of paper.

The students will each receive a sheet of white drawing paper. The paper can be any size, but a recommended size is 11 inches X 14 inches. Then, the students will draw a teacher approved design on the paper. The goal is for the design to fill the center of the paper. Once the image is done, the students will color the image with coloring pencils. Be sure to give students the colors that match the available construction paper. The colored design will serve as a color map for the construction paper.

Afterwards, the students will receive sheets of construction paper that matches the colors of their design. The students will cut the construction paper into strips. The teacher can determine the width of the strips. The students can use the width of a ruler, a measurement on a ruler, or a popsicle stick to maintain a set size. Once the strips are cut, the students will cut them into 2 – 3 inch pieces. Then the students will glue the construction paper strip to the matching colors on the drawing paper. For example, if a student drew a yellow circle, then they will glue yellow construction paper pieces on top of the yellow circle. The goal is to layer the glued pieces to cover the drawings paper completely. As each piece of paper is glued, the students will bend the piece of paper to cause it to stand off of the drawing paper. This process will help create a low-relief sculpture. After the drawn image is covered in construction paper, the students can fill the extra drawing paper with construction paper to create a colorful background.

The end result will be a unique low-relief paper sculpture that is designed from the students’ drawings. This activity will take time to complete and may need to be altered for Kindergarten, First, and possibly Second grade. There is not an art history activity attached to this lesson plan, to provide adequate time to complete the project. However, the teacher can choose to include an artist statement activity or a written assignment that helps students connect the class project to Linda Ridgway’s artwork.


Middle School Lesson Plan

Goals:

Middle School Students of all Levels will be able to do the following:

  • Identify the principles of design used in the artwork;
  • Identify the elements of design used in the artwork;
  • Recognize the difference between high-relief and low-relief sculpture;
  • Identify how to make a three-dimensional low-relief sculpture using paper;
  • Learn about Linda Ridgway and her work Forever;
  • Learn about Tromp L’oeil and how it is identified in art;
  • And, create a low-relief paper sculpture by cutting strips of construction paper and gluing one side of the cut paper to a larger sheet of white drawing paper.

Texas Middle School TEKS:

Art 1, Art 2, Art 3


Art 1:

  • §117.202.c.1.A / B / C
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • identify and illustrate concepts from direct observation, original sources, personal experiences, and communities such as family, school, cultural, local, regional, national, and international;
      • understand and apply the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artworks using art vocabulary appropriately;
      • understand and apply the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artworks using art vocabulary appropriately;
  • §117.202.c.1.A / B
    • Creative Expression:
      • create original artworks based on direct observations, original sources, personal experiences, and the community;
      • apply the art-making process to solve problems and generate design solutions;
  • §117.202.c.4.A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response
      • create written or oral responses to artwork using appropriate art vocabulary;
      • analyze original artworks using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist’s intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;

Art 2:

  • §117.203.b.1.A / B / C
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • identify and illustrate ideas from direct observation, original sources, imagination, personal experiences, and communities such as family, school, cultural, local, regional, national, and international;
      • compare and contrast the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artworks using vocabulary accurately;
      • compare and contrast the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artworks using vocabulary accurately;
  • §117.203.b.1. A
    • Creative Expression:
      • create original artworks that express a variety of ideas based on direct observations, original sources, and personal experiences, including memory, identity, imagination, and the community;
  • §117.203.b.4.A / B / C
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • create written or oral responses about personal or collaborative artworks addressing purpose, technique, organization, judgment, and personal expression;
      • analyze original artworks using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist’s intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;
      • investigate and explore original artworks in a variety of venues outside of the classroom such as museums, galleries, or community art.

Art 3:

  • §117.203.b.1.A / B / C / D
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • identify and illustrate concepts from direct observation, original sources, imagination, personal experience, and communities such as family, school, cultural, local, regional, national, and international;
      • evaluate the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artworks using vocabulary accurately;
      • evaluate the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artworks using vocabulary accurately;
  • §117.203.b.1.A
    • Creative Expression:
      • create original artworks expressing themes found through direct observation; original sources; personal experiences, including memory, identity, and imagination; and the community;
  • §117.203.b.4.A / B / C
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • create written and oral responses about personal or collaborative artworks addressing purpose, technique, organization, judgment, and personal expression;
      • analyze original artworks and portfolios using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist’s intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;
      • investigate and explore original artworks in a variety of venues outside of the classroom such as museums, galleries, or community art;

Middle School Art Activity

Questions for Middle School Students:

  1. Examine Linda Ridgway’s work Forever. Identify where each element of art is located in the art.
  2. Examine Linda Ridgway’s work Forever. Identify where each principle of art is located in the art.
  3. What is Tromp L’oeil?
  4. Is Linda Ridgway’s use of Tromp L’oeil successful? Why or why not?
  5. What is the difference between a high-relief and low-relief sculpture?

Activity: Middle School Fine Arts

  • Activity Setting: Classroom
  • Materials: White Drawing Paper, Pencil, Coloring Pencils, Construction Paper, Scissors, and Glue Stick or Liquid Glue
  • Grade Levels: Art 1, Art 2, Art 3
  • Subject: Low-Relief Sculpture, Paper Sculpture, Color Matching
  • Duration: Extended Project

The students will learn about Linda Ridgway’s use of Tromp L’oeil and low-relief sculpture in her piece Forever. Then, the students will create their own paper sculpture. This project will not require the students to employ Tromp L’oeil in the finished product. Instead, the inclusion of the subject is to help the students learn about Ridgway’s creative manipulation of paper.

The students will each receive a sheet of white drawing paper. The paper can be any size, but a recommended size is 11 inches X 14 inches. Then, the students will draw either a teacher approved design on the paper. The goal is for the design to fill the center of the paper. Once the image is done, the students will color the image with coloring pencils. Be sure to give students the colors that match the available construction paper. The colored design will serve as a color map for the construction paper.

Afterwards, the students will receive sheets of construction paper that matches the colors of their design. The students will cut the construction paper into strips. The teacher can determine the width of the strips. The students can use the width of a ruler, a measurement on a ruler, or a popsicle stick to maintain a set size. Once the strips are cut, the students will cut them into 2 – 3 inch pieces. Then the students will glue the construction paper strip to the matching colors on the drawing paper. For example, if a student drew a yellow circle, then they will glue yellow construction paper pieces on top of the yellow circle. The goal is to layer the glued pieces to cover the drawings paper completely. As each piece of paper is glued, the students will bend the piece of paper to cause it to stand off of the drawing paper. This process will help create a low-relief sculpture. After the drawn image is covered in construction paper, the students can fill the surrouding drawing paper with constrcution paper to create a colorful background.

The end result will be a unique low-relief paper sculpture that is designed from the students’ drawings. This activity will take time to complete. There is not an art history activity attached to this lesson plan, to provide adequate time to complete the project. However, the teacher can choose to include an artist statement activity or a written assignment that helps students connect the class project to Linda Ridgway’s artwork.


High School Lesson Plan

Goals:

High School Students of all Levels will be able to do the following:

  • Identify the principles of design used in the artwork;
  • Identify the elements of design used in the artwork;
  • Recognize the difference between high-relief and low-relief sculpture;
  • Identify how to make a three-dimensional low-relief sculpture using paper;
  • Learn about Linda Ridgway and her work Forever;
  • Learn about Tromp L’oeil and how it is identified in art;
  • And, create a low-relief paper sculpture by cutting strips of construction paper and gluing one side of the cut paper to a larger sheet of white drawing paper.

Texas High School TEKS:

Art Level I, Level II, Level III, and Level IV


Level I:

  • §117.302.c.1.A / B / C
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • consider concepts and ideas from direct observation, original sources, experiences, and imagination for original artwork;
      • identify and understand the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artwork;
      • identify and understand the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artwork;
  • §117.302.c.2.A / D
    • Creative Expression:
      • use visual solutions to create original artwork by problem solving through direct observation, original sources, experiences, narrations, and imagination;
      • create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions;
  • §117.302.c.4.A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response
      • interpret, evaluate, and justify artistic decisions in artwork by self, peers, and other artists such as that in museums, local galleries, art exhibits, and websites;
      • evaluate and analyze artwork using a verbal or written method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist’s intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;

Level II:

  • §117.303.c.1.A / B / C
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • use visual comparisons to illustrate concepts and ideas from direct observation, original sources, experiences, narration, and imagination for original artworks;
      • identify and apply the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artworks;
      •  identify and apply the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity in personal artworks;
  • §117.303.c.2.A / D
    • Creative Expression:
      • create original artwork using multiple solutions from direct observation, original sources, experiences, and imagination in order to expand personal themes that demonstrate artistic intent;
      •  create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions;
  • §117.303.c.4.A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • interpret, evaluate, and justify artistic decisions in artwork by self, peers, and other artists such as that in museums, local galleries, art exhibits, and websites;
      • evaluate and analyze artwork using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist’s intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;

Level III:

  • §117.304.c.1.A / B / C
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • analyze visual characteristics of sources to illustrate concepts, demonstrate flexibility in solving problems, create multiple solutions, and think imaginatively;
      • compare and contrast the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artwork;
      • compare and contrast the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artwork;
  • §117.304.c.2.A / D
    • Creative Expression:
      • create original artwork using multiple solutions from direct observation, original sources, experiences, and imagination in order to expand personal themes that demonstrate artistic intent;
      • create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions;
  • §117.304.c.4.A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • interpret, evaluate, and justify artistic decisions in artwork such as that in museums, local galleries, art exhibits, and websites based on evaluation of developmental progress, competency in problem solving, and a variety of visual ideas;
      • evaluate and analyze artwork using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist’s intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;

Level IV:

  • §117.305.c.1.A / B / C
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • consider concepts and themes for personal artwork that integrate an extensive range of visual observations, experiences, and imagination;
      • compare and contrast the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artwork;
      • compare and contrast the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artwork;
  • §117.305.c.2.A /D
    • Creative Expression:
      • produce an original body of artwork that integrates information from a variety of sources, including original sources, and demonstrates sustained self-directed investigations into specific themes such as a series or concentration of works;
      • create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions;
  • §117.305.c.4.A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • develop evaluative criteria to justify artistic decisions in artwork such as that in museums, local galleries, art exhibits, and websites based on a high level of creativity and expertise in one or more art areas;
      • evaluate and analyze artwork using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist’s intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;

High School Art Activity

Questions for High School Students:

  1. Examine Linda Ridgway’s work Forever. Identify where each element of art is located in the art.
  2. Examine Linda Ridgway’s work Forever. Identify where each principle of art is located in the art.
  3. What is Tromp L’oeil?
  4. Is Linda Ridgway’s use of Tromp L’oeil successful? Why or why not?
  5. What is the difference between a high-relief and low-relief sculpture?

Activity: High School Fine Arts

  • Activity Setting: Classroom
  • Materials: White Drawing Paper, Pencil, Coloring Pencils, Construction Paper, Scissors, and Glue Stick or Liquid Glue
  • Subject: Low-Relief Sculpture, Paper Sculpture, Color Matching
  • Texas TEKS: Art Level I, Level II, Level III, and Level IV
  • Duration: Extended Project

The students will learn about Linda Ridgway’s use of Tromp L’oeil and low-relief sculpture in her piece Forever. Then, the students will create their own paper sculpture. This project will not require the students to employ Tromp L’oeil in the finished product. Instead, the inclusion of the subject is to help the students learn about Ridgway’s creative manipulation of paper.

The students will each receive a sheet of white drawing paper. The paper can be any size, but a recommended size is 11 inches X 14 inches. Then, the students will draw either a teacher approved design on the paper. The goal is for the design to fill the center of the paper. Once the image is done, the students will color the image with coloring pencils. Be sure to give students the colors that match the available construction paper. The colored design will serve as a color map for the construction paper.

Afterwards, the students will receive sheets of construction paper that matches the colors of their design. The students will cut the construction paper into strips. The teacher can determine the width of the strips. The students can use the width of a ruler, a measurement on a ruler, or a popsicle stick to maintain a set size. Once the strips are cut, the students will cut them into 2 – 3 inch pieces. Then the students will glue the construction paper strip to the matching colors on the drawing paper. For example, if a student drew a yellow circle, then they will glue yellow construction paper pieces on top of the yellow circle. The goal is to layer the glued pieces to cover the drawings paper completely. As each piece of paper is glued, the students will bend the piece of paper to cause it to stand off of the drawing paper. This process will help create a low-relief sculpture. After the drawn image is covered in construction paper, the students can fill the surrouding drawing paper with constrcution paper to create a colorful background.

The end result will be a unique low-relief paper sculpture that is designed from the students’ drawings. This activity will take time to complete. There is not an art history activity attached to this lesson plan, to provide adequate time to complete the project. However, the teacher can choose to include an artist statement activity or a written assignment that helps students connect the class project to Linda Ridgway’s artwork.


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