Lesson Plan: Jon Flaming’s “Fruit Stand, East Texas”

(Jon Flaming, Fruit Stand, East Texas, 2005, acrylic on masonite, Tyler Museum of Art, Tyler, Texas.)

This lesson plan contains the Texas TEKS for Elementary, Middle, and High School art teachers. Additionally, it provides art vocabulary, fine art projects, and art history assignments. This lesson plan is centered on Jon Flaming’s Fruit Stand, East Texas.

If you use or reference this lesson plan, please leave a comment with your feedback.

Culture: American

Subject: Fine Arts, Art History

Collection: Tyler Museum of Art Permanent Collection

Grades: Elementary School, Middle School and High School

Topics: Artistic Practices, Art History, Critical Thinking

Art Vocabulary

Activity Vocabulary

Genre Scene: A painting that exhibits scenes and structures from everyday life; often includes figures and objects arranged in a space to appear mundane and ordinary.

Acrylic Paint: Acrylic paint is a type of water-based paint commonly used by practicing artists. Originally developed in the 1960’s, it dries quickly and can be layered to create opaque compositions and translucent washes.

Masonite: Invented by William Mason, Masonite board is created from pressing wood fiber and wood pulp with paper to create artificial wood. It is used in furniture and painting boards.

Contemporary Art: An open-ended phrase to categorize artwork created in the present era. Work developed within this phase includes realistic art, abstract art and avant-garde compositions.

Artist Statement: An artist statement is designed to explain the artist’s compositional decisions made in the development of the artwork. The statement can range between 250 words to three pages.


Elements of Design: Artists use the elements of design to create the foundation of the artwork. The elements of art include: line, shape, form, space, color, and texture.

Line: An element of design; line is created on a surface with a pointed moving tool. Lines can range in size, width, texture, and presentation. Common types of line are vertical, horizontal, diagonal, zig-zag, and curved.

Shape: An element of design; shape is a two-dimensional enclosed space that represents either an organic shape or a geometric shape. Geometric shapes include squares, circles, rectangles, triangles and other standard geometric shapes. Organic shapes include natural non-geometric shapes that are developed from curvilinear lines.

Form: An element of design; form is a three-dimensional enclosed space that represents organic and geometric shapes in a third space. Geometric forms include cubes, spheres, triangular prisms, rectangular prisms, and cones. Organic shapes include three-dimensional forms observed in nature, such as trees, rivers, and rocks.

Space: An element of design; this term defines the surface area between, before, and behind an object in a composition.

Color: An element of design; this term defines the pigments used in a painting. Color can be organized into categories, such as: hues, values, complements, and intensity.

Texture: An element of design; this term defines an artwork’s surface. The artist’s use of the chosen medium creates either implied or actual texture.


Principles of Design: Artists used principles of design to build upon the foundational elements of design. This includes the following: rhythm, movement, balance, proportion, variety, emphasis, and unity.  

Rhythm/ Pattern: A principle of design; this term defines the repetitive imagery and elements of design found in a composition.

Movement: A principle of design; this term defines the visual movement observed in a painting. This can be identified as kinetic movement or implied movement. Additionally, movement can be defined as how the viewer’s eye moves throughout the composition.

Balance: A principle of design; this term defines the arrangement of the presented imagery with the elements of design. It refers to either asymmetrical compositions or symmetrical compositions.

Proportion: A principle of design; this term defines the comparative size between objects in the composition. It can refer to the imagery within a painting or the size between a sculpture and a real object.

Variety: A principle of design; this term defines the combination of imagery, objects, and ideas in an artwork.

Emphasis: A principle of design; this term defines the most prominent area in a composition. The viewer’s eye is drawn to this point because the artist used a mixture of the elements and principles of design.

Unity: A principle of design; this term defines how the elements and principles of design are combined within a composition.


Resources for Vocabulary:

“Art Term: Acrylic Paint.” Tate Modern Museum of Art. Updated 2021. Accessed May 7, 2021. https://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/a/acrylic-paint.

“Art Term: Contemporary Art.” Tate Modern Museum of Art. Updated 2021. Accessed May 7, 2021. https://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/c/contemporary-art.

Ragan, Rosalins. “Elements of Art.” In Art Talk, 61 – 211. Edited by Bennett and McKnight Division. San Fransico: Glencoe Publishing Company, 1988.

Ragan, Rosalins. “The Principles of Design.” In Art Talk, 211 – 347. Edited by Bennett and McKnight Division. San Fransisco: Glencoe Publishing Company, 1988. Zohn, Kristen Miller. What Lies Beneath: Masonite and American Art of the 20th Century. Laurel: Lauren Rodgers Museum of Art, 2019.

Elementary School Lesson Plans

Goals:

Elementary School Students of all Levels will be able to do the following:

  • Identify the principles of design used in the artwork;
  • Identify the elements of design used in the artwork;
  • Identify the art historical significance of the artwork;
  • And identify the connection between a genre scene and daily activities.

Texas Elementary School TEKS:

Kindergarten, First Grade, Second Grade, Third Grade, Fourth Grade, and Fifth Grade

Kindergarten:

  • §117.102.b.1.A / B
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • gather information from subjects in the environment using the senses;
      • identify the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, and form, and the principles of design, including repetition/pattern and balance, in the environment.
  • §117.102.b.2. A / B / C
    • Creative Expression:
      • create artworks using a variety of lines, shapes, colors, textures, and forms;
      • arrange components intuitively to create artworks.
  • §117.102.b.3. A / B / C
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • share ideas about personal experiences such as family and friends and develop awareness and sensitivity to differing experiences and opinions through artwork.
  • §117.102.b.4.B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • express ideas found in collections such as real or virtual art museums, galleries, portfolios, or exhibitions using original artworks created by artists or peers.

First Grade:

  • 117.105.b.1.A / B
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • identify the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, and form, and the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, and balance, in nature and human-made environments.
  • §117.105.b.2. A / B / C
    • Creative Expression:
      • invent images that combine a variety of lines, shapes, colors, textures, and forms.
  • §117.105.b.3. A / B / C
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • identify simple ideas expressed in artworks through different media;
      • discuss the use of art in everyday life.
  • §117.105.b.4. B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • identify ideas found in collections such as real or virtual art museums, galleries, portfolios, or exhibitions using original artworks created by artists or peers.

Second Grade:

  • §117.108.b.1.A / B
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • compare and contrast variations in objects and subjects from the environment using the senses;
      • identify the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, and space, and the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, and balance.
  • §117.108.b.2. A / B / C
    • Creative Expression:
      • express ideas and feelings in personal artworks using a variety of lines, shapes, colors, textures, forms, and space;
  • §117.108.b.3. A / B / C
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • examine historical and contemporary artworks created by men and women, making connections to various cultures;
      • analyze how art affects everyday life and is connected to jobs in art and design.
  • §117.108.b.4. A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • support reasons for preferences in personal artworks;
      • compare and contrast ideas found in collections such as real or virtual art museums, galleries, portfolios, or exhibitions using original artworks created by artists or peers

Third Grade:

  • §117.111.b.1.A / B / C
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • explore ideas from life experiences about self, peers, family, school, or community and from the imagination as sources for original works of art;
      • use appropriate vocabulary when discussing the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, and the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity;
      • discuss the elements of art as building blocks and the principles of design as organizers of works of art.
  • §117.111.b.2. A / B / C
    • Creative Expression
      • integrate ideas drawn from life experiences to create original works of art;
      • create compositions using the elements of art and principles of design.
  • §117.111.b.3. A / B / C
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • identify simple main ideas expressed in artworks from various times and places;
      • compare and contrast artworks created by historical and contemporary men and women, making connections to various cultures.
  • §117.111.b.4. A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response
      • evaluate the elements of art, principles of design, or expressive qualities in artworks of self, peers, and historical and contemporary artists;

Fourth Grade:

  • §117.114.b.1.A / B / C
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • explore and communicate ideas drawn from life experiences about self, peers, family, school, or community and from the imagination as sources for original works of art;
      • use appropriate vocabulary when discussing the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, and the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity;
      • discuss the elements of art as building blocks and the principles of design as organizers of works of art.
  • §117.114.b.2. A / B / C
    • Creative Expression:
      • integrate ideas drawn from life experiences to create original works of art;
      • create compositions using the elements of art and principles of design.
  • §117.114.b.3. A / B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • compare content in artworks for various purposes such as the role art plays in reflecting life, expressing emotions, telling stories, or documenting history and traditions;
  • §117.114.b.4. A
    • Critical Evaluation and Response
      • evaluate the elements of art, principles of design, intent, or expressive qualities in artworks of self, peers, and historical and contemporary artists

Fifth Grade:

  • §117.117.b.1. A / B / C
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • use appropriate vocabulary when discussing the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, and the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity; and
      • discuss the elements of art as building blocks and the principles of design as organizers of works of art.
  • §117.117.b.2. A / B / C
    • Creative Expression:
      • integrate ideas drawn from life experiences to create original works of art;
      • create compositions using the elements of art and principles of design.
  • §117.117.b.3. A / B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • compare the purpose and effectiveness of artworks from various times and places, evaluating the artist’s use of media and techniques, expression of emotions, or use of symbols.
  • §117.117.b.4. A
    • Critical Evaluation and Response
      • evaluate the elements of art, principles of design, general intent, media and techniques, or expressive qualities in artworks of self, peers, or historical and contemporary artists.

Elementary School Art Activities:

Questions for Elementary School Students:

  1. Examine Jon Flaming’s composition Fruit Stand, East Texas. Identify the compositional aspects that make the painting a Genre Scene.
  2. Identify the Elements of Design used in Flaming’s work. Specify where each element is located and how it is used to build the scene.
  3. Identify the Principles of Design used in Flaming’s work. Specify where each element is located and how it is used to build the scene.
  4. What is the purpose of the painting? Explain.
  5. Write about a daily activity in your life.

Activity: Elementary School Fine Arts

  • Activity Setting: Classroom
  • Materials: Coloring Pencil, Graphite Pencil, and Paper
  • Subject: Sketching, Color
  • Texas TEKS: Art 1, Art 2, Art 3
  • Duration: Single Day Project or an Extended Project

Examine Jon Flaming’s painting Fruit Stand, East Texas and identify his presentation of a Genre Scene. Draw your neighbor sitting across from you as he or she is drawing you. Use the Principles and Elements of Design to develop your composition. Afterwards, discuss why this is a presentation of Genre Scene.

Activity: Elementary School Art History

  • Activity Setting: Classroom
  • Materials: Pencil/ Pen on Paper or Word Document
  • Subject: Research, Artwork Analysis
  • Texas TEKS: Art 1, Art 2, Art 3
  • Duration: Single Day Assignment or a Research Paper

Examine Jon Flaming’s painting Fruit Stand, East Texas and identify his presentation of a Genre Scene. Write about your daily activities you participate in during your day. Then, write about the figure in the painting and his job at the Peaches Stand. Afterwards, identify how the discussed daily activities are representative of a Genre Scene.

Resources:

“19 TAC Chapter 117. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts.” Texas Education Agency. Updated 2020. Accessed April 29, 2021. http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter117/.

Goddard, Charity. “Object Record: Fruit Stand, East, Texas.” Tyler Museum of Art. Updated 2021. Accessed April 29, 2021. https://tylermuseum.pastperfectonline.com/webobject/
4205B0C7-BAC9-4D18-BDC0-001030283322.

“Art Term: Genre Painting.” Tate Modern Museum of Art. Updated 2021. Accessed April 29, 2021. https://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/g/genre-painting.

Flaming, Jon. “Jon Flaming: Journal.” Jon Flaming Design, Updated 2020. Accessed April 29, 2021. http://jonflaming.com/.

Middle School Lesson Plans

Goals:

Middle School Students of all Levels will be able to do the following:

  • Identify the Principles of Design used in the artwork;
  • Identify the Elements of Design used in the artwork;
  • Identify the Art Historical significance of the artwork;
  • Define a Genre Scene and recognize contemporary Genre Scenes;
  • And the student will create a Genre Scene that was identified from his or her chosen environment.

Texas Middle School TEKS:

Art 1, Art 2, Art 3

Art 1:

  • §117.202.c.1.A / B / C / D
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • understand and apply the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artworks using art vocabulary appropriately;
      • understand and apply the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artworks using art vocabulary appropriately;
      • discuss the expressive properties of artworks such as appropriation, meaning, narrative, message, and symbol using art vocabulary accurately.
  • §117.202.c.1.A / B / C
    • Creative Expression:
      • create original artworks based on direct observations, original sources, personal experiences, and the community.
  • §117.202.c.3.A / B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • identify examples of art that convey universal themes such as beliefs, cultural narrative, life cycles, the passage of time, identity, conflict, and cooperation.
  • §117.202.c.4.A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response
      • create written or oral responses to artwork using appropriate art vocabulary.

Art 2:

  • §117.203.b.1.A / B / C / D
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • compare and contrast the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artworks using vocabulary accurately;
      • compare and contrast the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artworks using vocabulary accurately;
      • understand and apply the expressive properties of artworks such as appropriation, meaning, narrative, message, and symbol using art vocabulary accurately.
  • §117.203.b.1.A / B / C
    • Creative Expression:
      • create original artworks that express a variety of ideas based on direct observations, original sources, and personal experiences, including memory, identity, imagination, and the community;
  • §117.203.b.3.A / B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • analyze selected artworks to determine contemporary relevance in relationship to universal themes such as belief, cultural narrative, life cycles, the passage of time, identity, conflict, and cooperation.
  • §117.203.b.4.A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • create written or oral responses about personal or collaborative artworks addressing purpose, technique, organization, judgment, and personal expression;

Art 3:

  • §117.203.b.1.A / B / C / D
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • evaluate the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artworks using vocabulary accurately;
      • evaluate the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artworks using vocabulary accurately;
      • compare and contrast the expressive properties of artworks, including appropriation, meaning, narrative, message, and symbol, using vocabulary accurately.
  • §117.203.b.1.A / B / C
    • Creative Expression:
      • create original artworks expressing themes found through direct observation; original sources; personal experiences, including memory, identity, and imagination; and the community.
  • §117.203.b.3.A / B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • analyze cultural ideas expressed in artworks relating to social, political, and environmental themes such as environment/nature, conflict and power, relationships to others, and reality/fantasy.
  • §117.203.b.4.A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • create written and oral responses about personal or collaborative artworks addressing purpose, technique, organization, judgment, and personal expression.

Middle School Art Activities:

Questions for Middle School Students:

  1. Examine Jon Flaming’s composition Fruit Stand, East Texas. Identify the aspects that make the painting a Genre Scene.
  2. Identify the Elements of Design used in Flaming’s work. Specify where each element is located and how it is used to build the scene.
  3. Identify the Principles of Design used in Flaming’s work. Specify where each element is located and how it is used to build the scene.
  4. What is the purpose of the painting? Explain.
  5. How did Flaming use Pattern to express different textures and shading? Is it successful?

Activity: Middle School Fine Arts

  • Activity Setting: Classroom
  • Materials: Acrylic Paint, Paint Brushes, Water Cup, Pencil, and Paper or Canvas
  • Subject: Painting, Sketching
  • Texas TEKS: Art 1, Art 2, Art 3
  • Duration: Single Day Project or an Extended Project

Examine Jon Flaming’s painting Fruit Stand, East Texas and identify his presentation of a Genre Scene. Create your own Genre Scene. Take a photo or sketch your family and/or friends participating in a daily activity. Use the photo or sketch as a reference to paint a Genre Scene. You can refer to Flaming’s art style or develop your own methods of painting.

Activity: Middle School Art History

  • Activity Setting: Classroom
  • Materials: Pencil/ Pen on Paper or Word Document
  • Subject: Research, Artwork Analysis
  • Texas TEKS: Art 1, Art 2, Art 3
  • Duration: Single Day Assignment or a Research Paper

Examine Jon Flaming’s painting Fruit Stand, East Texas and identify his presentation of a Genre Scene. Write an art historical critical response about the painting. Answer the following question: Does the painting successfully represent a scene of daily life? Why or why not? Use sources and cite the references in a bibliography.

Resources:

“19 TAC Chapter 117. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts.” Texas Education Agency. Updated 2020. Accessed April 29, 2021. http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter117/.

Goddard, Charity. “Object Record: Fruit Stand, East, Texas.” Tyler Museum of Art. Updated 2021. Accessed April 29, 2021. https://tylermuseum.pastperfectonline.com/webobject/
4205B0C7-BAC9-4D18-BDC0-001030283322.

“Art Term: Genre Painting.” Tate Modern Museum of Art. Updated 2021. Accessed April 29, 2021. https://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/g/genre-painting.

Flaming, Jon. “Jon Flaming: Journal.” Jon Flaming Design, Updated 2020. Accessed April 29, 2021. http://jonflaming.com/.

High School Lesson Plans

Goals:

High School Students of all Levels will be able to do the following:

  • Identify the Principles of Design used in the artwork;
  • Identify the Elements of Design used in the artwork;
  • Identify the Art Historical significance of the artwork;
  • Define a Genre Scene and recognize contemporary Genre Scenes;
  • And the student will create a Genre Scene that was identified from his or her chosen environment.

Texas High School TEKS:

Art Level I, Level II, Level III, and Level IV

Level I:

  • §117.302.c.1.A / B / C / D
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • identify and understand the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artwork;
      • identify and understand the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artwork;
      • make judgments about the expressive properties such as content, meaning, message, and metaphor of artwork using art vocabulary accurately.
  • §117.302.c.2.A / D / F
    • Creative Expression:
      • create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions.
  • §117.302.c.3.B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance
      • describe general characteristics in artwork from a variety of cultures, which might also include personal identity and heritage.
  • §117.302.c.4.A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response
      • evaluate and analyze artwork using a verbal or written method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist’s intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork.

Level II:

  • §117.303.c.1.A / B / C / D
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • use visual comparisons to illustrate concepts and ideas from direct observation, original sources, experiences, narration, and imagination for original artworks;
      • identify and apply the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artworks;
      •  identify and apply the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity in personal artworks.
  • §117.303.c.2.A / B / D / F
    • Creative Expression:
      • create original artwork using multiple solutions from direct observation, original sources, experiences, and imagination in order to expand personal themes that demonstrate artistic intent;
      • create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions.
  • §117.303.c.3.A / B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • analyze specific characteristics in artwork from a variety of cultures.
  • §117.303.c.4.A / B / C
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • evaluate and analyze artwork using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist’s intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;
      • use responses to artwork critiques to make decisions about future directions in personal work.

Level III:

  • §117.304.c.1.A / B / C / D
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • compare and contrast the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artwork;
      • compare and contrast the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artwork;
      • explore the suitability of art media and processes and select those appropriate to express specific ideas such as content, meaning, message, and metaphor relating to visual themes to interpret the expressive qualities of artwork.
  • §117.304.c.2.A / B / D / F
    • Creative Expression:
      • create original artwork using multiple solutions from direct observation, original sources, experiences, and imagination in order to expand personal themes that demonstrate artistic intent;
      • create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions.
  • §117.304.c.3.A / B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • distinguish the correlation between specific characteristics and influences of various cultures and contemporary artwork.
  • §117.304.c.4.A / B / C / D
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • interpret, evaluate, and justify artistic decisions in artwork such as that in museums, local galleries, art exhibits, and websites based on evaluation of developmental progress, competency in problem solving, and a variety of visual ideas;
      • analyze personal artwork in order to create a written response such as an artist’s statement reflecting intent, inspiration, the elements of art and principles of design within the artwork, and measure of uniqueness.

Level IV:

  • §117.305.c.1.A / B / C / D
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • compare and contrast the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artwork;
      • compare and contrast the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artwork;
      • discriminate between art media and processes to express complex visual relationships such as content, meaning, message, and metaphor using extensive art vocabulary.
  • §117.305.c.2.A / B / D / F
    • Creative Expression:
      • produce an original body of artwork that integrates information from a variety of sources, including original sources, and demonstrates sustained self-directed investigations into specific themes such as a series or concentration of works;
      • evaluate and justify design ideas and concepts to create a body of personal artwork.
  • §117.305.c.3.A / B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • analyze and evaluate the influence of contemporary cultures on artwork.
  • §117.305.c.4.A / B / C / D
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • develop evaluative criteria to justify artistic decisions in artwork such as that in museums, local galleries, art exhibits, and websites based on a high level of creativity and expertise in one or more art areas;
      • analyze personal artwork in order to create a written response such as an artist’s statement reflecting intent, inspiration, the elements of art and principles of design within the artwork, and the measure of uniqueness;

High School Art Activities:

Questions for High School Students:

  1. Examine Jon Flaming’s composition Fruit Stand, East Texas. Identify the aspects that make the painting a Genre Scene.
  2. Identify the Elements of Design used in Flaming’s work. Specify where each element is located and how it is used to build the scene.
  3. Identify the Principles of Design used in Flaming’s work. Specify where each element is located and how it is used to build the scene.
  4. What is the purpose of the painting? Explain.
  5. How did Flaming use Pattern to express different textures and shading? Is it successful?

Activity: High School Fine Arts

  • Activity Setting: Classroom and/or outdoor location
  • Materials: Acrylic Paint, Paint Brushes, Water Cup, Pencil, and Paper or Canvas
  • Subject: Painting, Sketching
  • Texas TEKS: Art Level I, Level II, Level III, and Level IV
  • Duration: Single Day Project or an Extended Project

Examine Jon Flaming’s painting Fruit Stand, East Texas and identify his presentation of a Genre Scene. Create your own Genre Scene. Take a photo or sketch your family and/or friends participating in a daily activity. Use the photo or sketch as a reference to paint a Genre Scene. You can refer to Flaming’s art style or develop your own methods of painting. Afterwards, write an artist statement discussing your art creation process. State where you used each Element and Principle of Design and explain how it was used to develop the composition.

Activity: High School Art History

  • Activity Setting: Classroom
  • Materials: Pencil/ Pen on Paper or Word Document
  • Subject: Research, Artwork Analysis
  • Texas TEKS: Art Level I, Level II, Level III, and Level IV
  • Duration: Single Day Assignment or a Research Paper

Examine Jon Flaming’s painting Fruit Stand, East Texas and identify his presentation of a Genre Scene. Write an art historical critical response about the painting. Answer the following question: Does the painting successfully represent a scene of daily life? Why or why not? Research other examples of a Genre Scene to compare and contrast with Flaming’s Fruit Stand, East Texas. Use sources and cite the references in a bibliography.

Resources:

“19 TAC Chapter 117. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts.” Texas Education Agency. Updated 2020. Accessed April 29, 2021. http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter117/.

Goddard, Charity. “Object Record: Fruit Stand, East, Texas.” Tyler Museum of Art. Updated 2021. Accessed April 29, 2021. https://tylermuseum.pastperfectonline.com/webobject/
4205B0C7-BAC9-4D18-BDC0-001030283322.

“Art Term: Genre Painting.” Tate Modern Museum of Art. Updated 2021. Accessed April 29, 2021. https://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/g/genre-painting.

Flaming, Jon. “Jon Flaming: Journal.” Jon Flaming Design, Updated 2020. Accessed April 29, 2021. http://jonflaming.com/.

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