Lesson Plan: The Cultural Significance of Pattern

(Javier de Jesús Hernández, Ginger Jar/ Tibor, 1992, glazed earthenware, 23.5 inches X 13.25 inches, Tyler Museum of Art, Tyler, Texas.)

This lesson plan contains the Texas TEKS for Elementary, Middle, and High School art teachers. Additionally, it provides art vocabulary, fine art projects, and art history assignments. This lesson is centered on the cultural patterns.

If you use or reference this lesson plan, please leave a comment with your feedback. The lesson plan can be downloaded in the link below.

Culture: Mexico

Subject: Fines Arts, Art History

Collection: Tyler Museum of Art Boeckman Collection

Grades: Elementary School, Middle School and High School

Topics: Artistic Practices, Art History, Critical Thinking

Art Vocabulary

Activity Vocabulary:

Ceramics:

  • The artistic methods of using clay, glazes, and ceramic firing methods to create a ceramic object. These objects can range in size, shape, and color.

Clay:

  • A material that is developed from wet earth and minerals. When it is drying or heated in a kiln, the clay hardens into a ceramic object.  

Bone-Dry Clay:

  • As clay dries in an open-air environment, the color of the clay will change from a red-brown color to a light grey. This result of this process is called bone-dry clay. When clay reaches this stage, it is ready to be placed in a kiln and fired.

Kiln:

  • A furnace that heats clay at high tempretures to create a ceramic object. The act of heating clay in a kiln is known as ‘firing’.

Glaze:

  • A thin coating of pigment that is painted or dipped on a ceramic work at the bone-dry stage. Dipping is when bone-dry clay is submerged into the glaze to fully cover the piece. Painting the glaze on the bone-dry clay enables the artist to create intricate designs on the clay.

Throwing:

  • A common process of creating a vessel out of clay. The artist places a section of clay on a throwing-wheel. He or she can control the speed at which the wheel will turn. As the wheel turns, the artist shapes the clay into a bowl, a cup, or a vase shape.

Majolica (Mayólica):

  • A floral design, often paried with imagery of animals and figures. This imagery is a derivative of Renaissance maiolica painted on italian ceramics between the 15th and 17th centuries.

Elements of Design:

  • Artists use the elements of design to create the foundation of the artwork. The elements of art include: line, shape, form, space, color, and texture.

Line:

  • An element of design; line is created on a surface with a pointed moving tool. Lines can range in size, width, texture, and presentation. Common types of line are vertical, horizontal, diagonal, zig-zag, and curved.

Shape:

  • An element of design; shape is a two-dimensional enclosed space that represents either an organic shape or a geometric shape. Geometric shapes include squares, circles, rectangles, triangles and other standard geometric shapes. Organic shapes include natural non-geometric shapes that are developed from curvilinear lines.

Form:

  • An element of design; form is a three-dimensional enclosed space that represents organic and geometric shapes in a third space. Geometric forms include cubes, spheres, triangular prisms, rectangular prisms, and cones. Organic shapes include three-dimensional forms observed in nature, such as trees, rivers, and rocks.

Space:

  • An element of design; this term defines the surface area between, before, and behind an object in a composition.

Color:

  • An element of design; this term defines the pigments used in a painting. Color can be organized into categories, such as: hues, values, complements, and intensity.

Texture:

  • An element of design; this term defines an artwork’s surface. The artist’s use of the chosen medium creates either implied or actual texture.

Principles of Design:

  • Artists used principles of design to build upon the foundational elements of design. This includes the following: rhythm, movement, balance, proportion, variety, emphasis, and unity. 

Rhythm/ Pattern:

  • A principle of design; this term defines the repetitive imagery and elements of design found in a composition.

Movement:

  • A principle of design; this term defines the visual movement observed in a painting. This can be identified as kinetic movement or implied movement. Additionally, movement can be defined as how the viewer’s eye moves throughout the composition.

Balance:

  • A principle of design; this term defines the arrangement of the presented imagery with the elements of design. It refers to either asymmetrical compositions or symmetrical compositions.

Proportion:

  • A principle of design; this term defines the comparative size between objects in the composition. It can refer to the imagery within a painting or the size between a sculpture and a real object.

Variety:

  • A principle of design; this term defines the combination of imagery, objects, and ideas in an artwork.

Emphasis:

  • A principle of design; this term defines the most prominent area in a composition. The viewer’s eye is drawn to this point because the artist used a mixture of the elements and principles of design.

Unity:

  • A principle of design; this term defines how the elements and principles of design are combined within a composition.

Resources for Vocabulary:

Delgado, Kevin. “Guanajuato.” In Explorer’s Guides: San Miguel de Allende and Guanajuato. Woodstock: The Countryman Press, 2011. https://www.google.com/books/edition/Explorer_s_Guide_San_Miguel_de_Allende_G/infpWx61thcC?hl=en&gbpv=1

Fournier, Patricia. “Mayolica of Cuanajuaio.” In Cerámica y Cultura: The Story of Spanish and Mexical Mayólica. Edited by Robin Farwell Gavin, Donna Pierce, and Alfonso Pleguezuelo, 297 – 314. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2003. https://www.google.com/books/edition/_/IHdoCDr_JaEC?hl=en&gbpv=1

Ragan, Rosalins. “Elements of Art.” In Art Talk, 61 – 211. Edited by Bennett and McKnight Division. San Fransico: Glencoe Publishing Company, 1988.

Ragan, Rosalins. “The Principles of Design.” In Art Talk, 211 – 347. Edited by Bennett and McKnight Division. San Fransisco: Glencoe Publishing Company, 1988.

Wilson, Timothy. “Introduction.” In Maiolica: Italian Renaissance Ceramics in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Edited by Timothy Wilson, 3 – 11. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2016. https://www.google.com/books/edition/Maiolica_Italian_Renaissance_Ceramics_in/2i_ADAAAQBAJ?q=&gbpv=1#f=false.

Elementary School Lesson Plans

Goals:

Elementary School Students of all Levels will be able to do the following:

  • Identify the principles of design used in the artwork;
  • Identify the elements of design used in the artwork;
  • Identify the art historical significance of the artwork;
  • And identify the cultural significance of pattern in ceramic artwork.

Texas Elementary School TEKS:

Kindergarten, First Grade, Second Grade, Third Grade, Fourth Grade, and Fifth Grade

Kindergarten:

  • §117.102.b.1.A / B
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • gather information from subjects in the environment using the senses;
      • identify the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, and form, and the principles of design, including repetition/pattern and balance, in the environment.
  • §117.102.b.2. A
    • Creative Expression:
      • create artworks using a variety of lines, shapes, colors, textures, and forms;
  • §117.102.b.3. A / B / C
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • share ideas about personal experiences such as family and friends and develop awareness and sensitivity to differing experiences and opinions through artwork;
      • identify the uses of art in everyday life;
  • §117.102.b.4.A / B / C
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • express ideas found in collections such as real or virtual art museums, galleries, portfolios, or exhibitions using original artworks created by artists or peers;

First Grade:

  • §117.105.b.1.A / B
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • identify similarities, differences, and variations among subjects in the environment using the senses;
      • identify the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, and form, and the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, and balance, in nature and human-made environments.
  • §117.105.b.2. A / B
    • Creative Expression:
      • invent images that combine a variety of lines, shapes, colors, textures, and forms;
      • place components in orderly arrangements to create designs;
  • §117.105.b.3.C
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • discuss the use of art in everyday life;
  • §117.105.b.4.B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • identify ideas found in collections such as real or virtual art museums, galleries, portfolios, or exhibitions using original artworks created by artists or peers.

Second Grade:

  • §117.108.b.1.A / B
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • compare and contrast variations in objects and subjects from the environment using the senses;
      • identify the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, and space, and the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, and balance.
  • §117.108.b.2. A / B
    • Creative Expression:
      • express ideas and feelings in personal artworks using a variety of lines, shapes, colors, textures, forms, and space;
      • create compositions using the elements of art and principles of design;
  • §117.108.b.3.B / C
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • examine historical and contemporary artworks created by men and women, making connections to various cultures;
      • analyze how art affects everyday life and is connected to jobs in art and design;
  • §117.108.b.4. A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • support reasons for preferences in personal artworks;
      • compare and contrast ideas found in collections such as real or virtual art museums, galleries, portfolios, or exhibitions using original artworks created by artists or peers;

Third Grade:

  • §117.111.b.1. B / C
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • use appropriate vocabulary when discussing the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, and the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity;
      • discuss the elements of art as building blocks and the principles of design as organizers of works of art.
  • §117.111.b.2.B
    • Creative Expression
      • create compositions using the elements of art and principles of design;
  • §117.111.b.3. A / B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • identify simple main ideas expressed in artworks from various times and places;
      • compare and contrast artworks created by historical and contemporary men and women, making connections to various cultures;
  • §117.111.b.4. A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response
      • evaluate the elements of art, principles of design, or expressive qualities in artworks of self, peers, and historical and contemporary artists;
      • use methods such as oral response or artist statements to identify main ideas found in collections of artworks created by self, peers, and major historical or contemporary artists in real or virtual portfolios, galleries, or art museums;

Fourth Grade:

  • §117.114.b.1.B / C
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • use appropriate vocabulary when discussing the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, and the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity;
      • discuss the elements of art as building blocks and the principles of design as organizers of works of art.
  • §117.114.b.2. A / B
    • Creative Expression:
      • integrate ideas drawn from life experiences to create original works of art;
      • create compositions using the elements of art and principles of design; and
  • §117.114.b.3.B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • compare purpose and content in artworks created by historical and contemporary men and women, making connections to various cultures;
  • §117.114.b.4. A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response
      • evaluate the elements of art, principles of design, intent, or expressive qualities in artworks of self, peers, and historical and contemporary artists.
      • use methods such as written or oral response or artist statements to identify emotions found in collections of artworks created by self, peers, and major historical or contemporary artists in real or virtual portfolios, galleries, or art museums;

Fifth Grade:

  • §117.117.b.1.B / C
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • use appropriate vocabulary when discussing the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, and the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity; and
      • discuss the elements of art as building blocks and the principles of design as organizers of works of art.
  • §117.117.b.2. A / B
    • Creative Expression:
      • integrate ideas drawn from life experiences to create original works of art;
      • create compositions using the elements of art and principles of design;
  • §117.117.b.3. A / B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • compare the purpose and effectiveness of artworks from various times and places, evaluating the artist’s use of media and techniques, expression of emotions, or use of symbols;
      • compare the purpose and effectiveness of artworks created by historic and contemporary men and women, making connections to various cultures;
  • §117.117.b.4. A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response
      • evaluate the elements of art, principles of design, general intent, media and techniques, or expressive qualities in artworks of self, peers, or historical and contemporary artists;
      • use methods such as written or oral response or artist statements to identify themes found in collections of artworks created by self, peers, and major historical or contemporary artists in real or virtual portfolios, galleries, or art museums;

Elementary School Art Activities:

Questions for Elementary School Students:

  1. Examine Javier de Jesús Hernández’s Ginger Jar/ Tibor. Identify where each element of design is located on the ceramic work.
  2. Examine Javier de Jesús Hernández’s Ginger Jar/ Tibor. Identify where each principle of design is located on the ceramic work.
  3. Identify the cultural significance of the jar within the culture of Mexico.
  4. Is the ceramic jar a work of art or a craft? Explain.

Activity: Elementary School Fine Arts

  • Activity Setting: Classroom
  • Materials: Construction Paper, Pencil, Scissors, Ruler, and Glue
  • Subject: Drawing, Designs
  • Texas TEKS: Kindergarten, First Grade, Second Grade, Third Grade, Fourth Grade, and Fifth Grade
  • Duration: Single Day Project or an Extended Project

Examine Javier de Jesús Hernández’s ceramic work Ginger Jar/ Tibor. Create a paper jar that exhibits a majolica design. Cut out a jar shape, using one color of construction paper. Then, using different colors, draw floral and curvierlinear designs. Cut out these designs and glue it to the paper jar. To complete the jar, draw an image of your favorite animal on a third color of construction paper. Cut out the animal and glue it in the center of the jar.


Activity: Elementary School Art History

  • Activity Setting: Classroom
  • Materials: Pencil/ Pen on Paper or Word Document
  • Subject: Research, Artwork Analysis
  • Texas TEKS: Kindergarten, First Grade, Second Grade, Third Grade, Fourth Grade, and Fifth Grade
  • Duration: Single Day Assignment or a Research Paper

Examine Javier de Jesús Hernández’s ceramic work Ginger Jar/ Tibor. Discuss how patterns are used in life by discussing specific examples.  

Example: Identify a specific pattern, such as a traffic light, and state how the light pattern is used to help drivers be safe on the road.


Resources:

“19 TAC Chapter 117. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts.” Texas Education Agency. Updated 2020. Accessed April 29, 2021. http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter117/.  

Delgado, Kevin. “Guanajuato.” In Explorer’s Guides: San Miguel de Allende and Guanajuato. Woodstock: The Countryman Press, 2011. https://www.google.com/books/edition/Explorer_s_Guide_San_Miguel_de_Allende_G/infpWx61thcC?hl=en&gbpv=1

Fournier, Patricia. “Mayolica of Cuanajuaio.” In Cerámica y Cultura: The Story of Spanish and Mexical Mayólica. Edited by Robin Farwell Gavin, Donna Pierce, and Alfonso Pleguezuelo, 297 – 314. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2003. https://www.google.com/books/edition/_/IHdoCDr_JaEC?hl=en&gbpv=1

Harris, Stephanie. “Object Record: Ginger Jar/Tibor.” Tyler Museum of Art. Updated 2021. Accessed: May 14, 2021. https://tylermuseum.pastperfectonline.com/webobject/D858B90F-EF07-4665-8085-513328973730.

Ragan, Rosalins. “Elements of Art.” In Art Talk, 61 – 211. Edited by Bennett and McKnight Division. San Fransico: Glencoe Publishing Company, 1988.

Ragan, Rosalins. “The Principles of Design.” In Art Talk, 211 – 347. Edited by Bennett and McKnight Division. San Fransisco: Glencoe Publishing Company, 1988.

Wilson, Timothy. “Introduction.” In Maiolica: Italian Renaissance Ceramics in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Edited by Timothy Wilson, 3 – 11. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2016. https://www.google.com/books/edition/Maiolica_Italian_Renaissance_Ceramics_in/2i_ADAAAQBAJ?q=&gbpv=1#f=false.

Middle School Lesson Plans

Goals:

Middle School Students of all Levels will be able to do the following:

  • Identify the Principles of Design used in the artwork;
  • Identify the Elements of Design used in the artwork;
  • Identify the Art Historical significance of the artwork;
  • And, identify the cultural significance of pattern in ceramic artwork.

Texas Middle School TEKS:

Art 1, Art 2, Art 3

Art 1:

  • §117.202.c.1.B / C / D
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • understand and apply the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artworks using art vocabulary appropriately;
      • understand and apply the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artworks using art vocabulary appropriately;
      • discuss the expressive properties of artworks such as appropriation, meaning, narrative, message, and symbol using art vocabulary accurately.
  • §117.202.c.1.A
    • Creative Expression:
      • create original artworks based on direct observations, original sources, personal experiences, and the community;
  • §117.202.c.3. B /
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • identify examples of art that convey universal themes such as beliefs, cultural narrative, life cycles, the passage of time, identity, conflict, and cooperation;
  • §117.202.c.4.A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response
      • create written or oral responses to artwork using appropriate art vocabulary;
      • analyze original artworks using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist’s intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;

Art 2:

  • §117.203.b.1. B / C / D
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • compare and contrast the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artworks using vocabulary accurately;
      • compare and contrast the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artworks using vocabulary accurately;
      • understand and apply the expressive properties of artworks such as appropriation, meaning, narrative, message, and symbol using art vocabulary accurately.
  • §117.203.b.1.A
    • Creative Expression:
      • create original artworks that express a variety of ideas based on direct observations, original sources, and personal experiences, including memory, identity, imagination, and the community;
  • §117.203.b.3.A / B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • analyze ways that global, cultural, historical, and political issues influence artworks;
      • analyze selected artworks to determine contemporary relevance in relationship to universal themes such as belief, cultural narrative, life cycles, the passage of time, identity, conflict, and cooperation;
  • §117.203.b.4.A / B / C / D / E
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • analyze original artworks using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist’s intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;

Art 3:

  • §117.203.b.1.B / C / D
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • evaluate the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artworks using vocabulary accurately;
      • evaluate the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artworks using vocabulary accurately;
      • compare and contrast the expressive properties of artworks, including appropriation, meaning, narrative, message, and symbol, using vocabulary accurately.
  • §117.203.b.1.A
    • Creative Expression:
      • create original artworks expressing themes found through direct observation; original sources; personal experiences, including memory, identity, and imagination; and the community;
  • §117.203.b.3. B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • analyze cultural ideas expressed in artworks relating to social, political, and environmental themes such as environment/nature, conflict and power, relationships to others, and reality/fantasy;
  • §117.203.b.4.A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • create written and oral responses about personal or collaborative artworks addressing purpose, technique, organization, judgment, and personal expression;
      • analyze original artworks and portfolios using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist’s intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;

Middle School Art Activities:

Questions for Middle School Students:

  1. Examine Javier de Jesús Hernández’s Ginger Jar/ Tibor. Identify where each element of design is located on the ceramic work.
  2. Examine Javier de Jesús Hernández’s Ginger Jar/ Tibor. Identify where each principle of design is located on the ceramic work.
  3. Identify the cultural significance of the jar within the culture of Mexico.
  4. Is the ceramic jar a work of art or a craft? Explain.

Activity: Middle School Fine Arts

  • Activity Setting: Classroom
  • Materials: Construction Paper, Drawing Paper, Pencil, Scissors, Ruler, Coloring Pencils, and Glue
  • Subject: Drawing, Design
  • Texas TEKS: Art 1, Art 2, Art 3
  • Duration: Single Day Project or an Extended Project

Examine Javier de Jesús Hernández’s ceramic work Ginger Jar/ Tibor. Create a paper jar that exhibits a majolica design. Cut out a jar shape, using one color of construction paper. Then, using different colors, draw floral and curvierlinear designs. Cut out these designs and glue it to the paper jar. To complete the jar, draw an image of an animal. It can be drawn on construction paper or white paper and colored with coloring pencils. Cut out the animal and glue it in the center of the jar. Once the jar is complete, write a short evaluation of your artwork. Explain the elements and principles of design used in the paper jar.

Activity: Middle School Art History

  • Activity Setting: Classroom
  • Materials: Pencil/ Pen on Paper or Word Document
  • Subject: Research, Artwork Analysis
  • Texas TEKS: Art 1, Art 2, Art 3
  • Duration: Single Day Assignment or a Research Paper

Examine Javier de Jesús Hernández’s ceramic work Ginger Jar/ Tibor. Write an art historical critical response about the ceramic work. Answer the following question: In what way does pattern have a cultural significance in an artwork? Use Hernández’s ceramic when you are explaining your answer. Use sources and cite the references in a bibliography.

Resources:

“19 TAC Chapter 117. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts.” Texas Education Agency. Updated 2020. Accessed April 29, 2021. http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter117/.

Delgado, Kevin. “Guanajuato.” In Explorer’s Guides: San Miguel de Allende and Guanajuato. Woodstock: The Countryman Press, 2011. https://www.google.com/books/edition/Explorer_s_Guide_San_Miguel_de_Allende_G/infpWx61thcC?hl=en&gbpv=1

Fournier, Patricia. “Mayolica of Cuanajuaio.” In Cerámica y Cultura: The Story of Spanish and Mexical Mayólica. Edited by Robin Farwell Gavin, Donna Pierce, and Alfonso Pleguezuelo, 297 – 314. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2003. https://www.google.com/books/edition/_/IHdoCDr_JaEC?hl=en&gbpv=1

Harris, Stephanie. “Object Record: Ginger Jar/Tibor.” Tyler Museum of Art. Updated 2021. Accessed: May 14, 2021. https://tylermuseum.pastperfectonline.com/webobject/D858B90F-EF07-4665-8085-513328973730.

Ragan, Rosalins. “Elements of Art.” In Art Talk, 61 – 211. Edited by Bennett and McKnight Division. San Fransico: Glencoe Publishing Company, 1988.

Ragan, Rosalins. “The Principles of Design.” In Art Talk, 211 – 347. Edited by Bennett and McKnight Division. San Fransisco: Glencoe Publishing Company, 1988.

Wilson, Timothy. “Introduction.” In Maiolica: Italian Renaissance Ceramics in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Edited by Timothy Wilson, 3 – 11. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2016. https://www.google.com/books/edition/Maiolica_Italian_Renaissance_Ceramics_in/2i_ADAAAQBAJ?q=&gbpv=1#f=false.

High School Lesson Plans

Goals:

High School Students of all Levels will be able to do the following:

  • Identify the Principles of Design used in the artwork;
  • Identify the Elements of Design used in the artwork;
  • Identify the Art Historical significance of the artwork;
  • And, identify the cultural significance of pattern in ceramic artwork.

Texas High School TEKS:

Art Level I, Level II, Level III, and Level IV

Level I:

  • §117.302.c.1. B / C / D
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • identify and understand the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artwork;
      • identify and understand the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artwork;
      • make judgments about the expressive properties such as content, meaning, message, and metaphor of artwork using art vocabulary accurately.
  • §117.302.c.2.A / D
    • Creative Expression:
      • use visual solutions to create original artwork by problem solving through direct observation, original sources, experiences, narrations, and imagination;
      • create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions;
  • §117.302.c.3.A / B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance
      • compare and contrast historical and contemporary styles while identifying general themes and trends;
      • describe general characteristics in artwork from a variety of cultures, which might also include personal identity and heritage;
  • §117.302.c.4. B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response
      • evaluate and analyze artwork using a verbal or written method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist’s intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;

Level II:

  • §117.303.c.1. B / C / D
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • identify and apply the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artworks;
      •  identify and apply the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity in personal artworks;
      • explore suitability of art media and processes to express specific ideas such as content, meaning, message, appropriation, and metaphor relating to visual themes of artworks using art vocabulary accurately.
  • §117.303.c.2. B / D
    • Creative Expression:
      • apply design skills in creating practical applications, clarifying presentations, and examining consumer choices in order to make successful design decisions;
      •  create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions;
  • §117.303.c.3.A / B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • examine selected historical periods or styles of art to identify general themes and trends;
      • analyze specific characteristics in artwork from a variety of cultures;
  • §117.303.c.4.A / B
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • interpret, evaluate, and justify artistic decisions in artwork by self, peers, and other artists such as that in museums, local galleries, art exhibits, and websites;
      • evaluate and analyze artwork using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist’s intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;

Level III:

  • §117.304.c.1. B / C
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • compare and contrast the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artwork;
      • compare and contrast the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artwork;
  • §117.304.c.2.A / B / D
    • Creative Expression:
      • create original artwork using multiple solutions from direct observation, original sources, experiences, and imagination in order to expand personal themes that demonstrate artistic intent;
      •  solve visual problems and develop multiple solutions for designing ideas, creating practical applications, clarifying presentations, and evaluating consumer choices in order to make successful design decisions;
      • create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions;
  • §117.304.c.3.A / B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • research selected historical periods, artists, general themes, trends, and styles of art;
      • distinguish the correlation between specific characteristics and influences of various cultures and contemporary artwork;
  • §117.304.c.4.B / C
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • evaluate and analyze artwork using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist’s intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;
      • analyze personal artwork in order to create a written response such as an artist’s statement reflecting intent, inspiration, the elements of art and principles of design within the artwork, and measure of uniqueness;

Level IV:

  • §117.305.c.1.B / C
    • Foundations: Observation and Perception:
      • compare and contrast the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artwork;
      • compare and contrast the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artwork;
  • §117.305.c.2.B / D
    • Creative Expression:
      • evaluate and justify design ideas and concepts to create a body of personal artwork;
      • create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions;
  • §117.305.c.3.A / B
    • Historical and Cultural Relevance:
      • research and report on selected historical periods, artists, general themes, trends, and styles of art;
      • analyze and evaluate the influence of contemporary cultures on artwork;
  • §117.305.c.4.A / B / C
    • Critical Evaluation and Response:
      • develop evaluative criteria to justify artistic decisions in artwork such as that in museums, local galleries, art exhibits, and websites based on a high level of creativity and expertise in one or more art areas;
      • evaluate and analyze artwork using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist’s intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;
      • analyze personal artwork in order to create a written response such as an artist’s statement reflecting intent, inspiration, the elements of art and principles of design within the artwork, and the measure of uniqueness;

High School Art Activities:

Questions for High School Students:

  1. Examine Javier de Jesús Hernández’s Ginger Jar/ Tibor. Identify where each element of design is located on the ceramic work.
  2. Examine Javier de Jesús Hernández’s Ginger Jar/ Tibor. Identify where each principle of design is located on the ceramic work.
  3. Identify the cultural significance of the jar within the culture of Mexico.
  4. Is the ceramic jar a work of art or a craft? Explain.

Activity: High School Fine Arts

  • Activity Setting: Classroom and/or outdoor location
  • Materials: Construction Paper, Drawing Paper, Pencil, Scissors, Ruler, Coloring Pencils, and Glue
  • Subject: Drawing, Design
  • Texas TEKS: Art Level I, Level II, Level III, and Level IV
  • Duration: Single Day Project or an Extended Project

Examine Javier de Jesús Hernández’s ceramic work Ginger Jar/ Tibor. Create a paper jar that exhibits a majolica design. Cut out a jar shape, using one color of construction paper. Then, using a different colors, draw floral and curvierlinear designs. Cut out these designs and glue it to the paper jar. To complete the jar, draw an image of an animal. It can be drawn on construction paper or white paper and colored with coloring pencils. Cut out the animal and glue it in the center of the jar. Once the jar is complete, write an evaluation of your artwork. Explain the elements and principles of design used in the paper jar.

Activity: High School Art History

  • Activity Setting: Classroom
  • Materials: Pencil/ Pen on Paper or Word Document
  • Subject: Research, Artwork Analysis
  • Texas TEKS: Art Level I, Level II, Level III, and Level IV
  • Duration: Single Day Assignment or a Research Paper

Examine Javier de Jesús Hernández’s ceramic work Ginger Jar/ Tibor. Write an art historical critical response about the ceramic work. Answer the following question: In what way does pattern have a cultural significance in an artwork? Use Hernández’s ceramic when you are explaining your answer. Use sources and cite the references in a bibliography.

Resources:

“19 TAC Chapter 117. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts.” Texas Education Agency. Updated 2020. Accessed April 29, 2021. http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter117/.

Delgado, Kevin. “Guanajuato.” In Explorer’s Guides: San Miguel de Allende and Guanajuato. Woodstock: The Countryman Press, 2011. https://www.google.com/books/edition/Explorer_s_Guide_San_Miguel_de_Allende_G/infpWx61thcC?hl=en&gbpv=1

Fournier, Patricia. “Mayolica of Cuanajuaio.” In Cerámica y Cultura: The Story of Spanish and Mexical Mayólica. Edited by Robin Farwell Gavin, Donna Pierce, and Alfonso Pleguezuelo, 297 – 314. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2003. https://www.google.com/books/edition/_/IHdoCDr_JaEC?hl=en&gbpv=1

Harris, Stephanie. “Object Record: Ginger Jar/Tibor.” Tyler Museum of Art. Updated 2021. Accessed: May 14, 2021. https://tylermuseum.pastperfectonline.com/webobject/D858B90F-EF07-4665-8085-513328973730.

Ragan, Rosalins. “Elements of Art.” In Art Talk, 61 – 211. Edited by Bennett and McKnight Division. San Fransico: Glencoe Publishing Company, 1988.

Ragan, Rosalins. “The Principles of Design.” In Art Talk, 211 – 347. Edited by Bennett and McKnight Division. San Fransisco: Glencoe Publishing Company, 1988.

Wilson, Timothy. “Introduction.” In Maiolica: Italian Renaissance Ceramics in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Edited by Timothy Wilson, 3 – 11. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2016. https://www.google.com/books/edition/Maiolica_Italian_Renaissance_Ceramics_in/2i_ADAAAQBAJ?q=&gbpv=1#f=false.

For more educational resources created by the Tyler Museum of Art, visit our YouTube page at the link below.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxut2kfUh_uO-RIQWVFzXPg/videos


If you use or reference this lesson plan, please leave a comment with your feedback.

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